Back to Contents Page

Setting Up and Using Your Computer

Dell™ Inspiron™ 530s Series Owner's Manual

  Front View of the Computer

  Back View of the Computer

  Back Panel Connectors

  Installing Your Computer in an Enclosure

  Setting Up a Printer

  Playing CDs and DVDs

  Copying CDs and DVDs

  Using a Media Card Reader (Optional)

  Connecting Two Monitors

  Power Management

  Enabling SpeedStep™ Technology

  About RAID Configurations

  Transferring Information to a New Computer

  Setting Up a Home and Office Network

  Connecting to the Internet



Front View of the Computer

Inspiron 530s/530sa/530sb/530sc/530sd

1

Service Tag (located on top of the chassis towards the back)

Use the Service Tag to identify your computer when you access the Dell Support website or call technical support.

2

eject button for CD/DVD drive

Press here to open/close the CD/DVD drive.

3

Flexbay open/close

Press here to open or close the floppy/media card reader panel

4

FlexBay drive

Can contain an optional floppy drive or optional Media Card Reader. For information on using the Media Card Reader, see Media Card Reader.

5

power button

Press the power button to turn on the computer.

NOTICE: To avoid losing data, do not use the power button to turn off the computer. Instead, perform an operating system shutdown.

6

power light

The light in the center of this button indicates power state.

7

USB 2.0 connectors (2)

Use the front USB connectors for devices that you connect occasionally, such as joysticks or cameras, or for bootable USB devices (see System Setup Options for more information on booting to a USB device).
It is recommended that you use the back USB connectors for devices that typically remain connected, such as printers and keyboards.

8

microphone connector

Use the microphone connector to attach a personal computer microphone for voice or musical input into a sound or telephony program.
On computers with a sound card, the microphone connector is on the card.

9

drive activity light

The drive activity light is on when the computer reads data from or writes data to the hard drive. The light might also be on when a device such as a CD player is operating.

10

headphone connector

Use the headphone connector to attach headphones and most kinds of speakers.

11

CD/DVD drive panel

This panel covers the CD/DVD drive.


Back View of the Computer

Inspiron 530s

1

security cable slot

Security cable slot lets you attach a commercially available antitheft device to the computer. For more information, see the instructions included with the device.

2

padlock rings

Padlock rings are for attaching a commercially available theft-deterrent device. The padlock rings allows you to secure the computer cover to the chassis with a padlock to prevent unauthorized access to the inside of the computer. To use the padlock rings, insert a commercially available padlock through the rings, and then lock the padlock.

3

power connector

Insert the power cable.

4

voltage selector switch

For selecting voltage rating.

5

power supply light

Indicates power availability for power supply.

NOTE: May or may not be available on your computer.

6

card slots

Access connectors for any installed PCI and PCI Express cards.

7

back panel connectors

Plug USB, audio, and other devices into the appropriate connector. See Back Panel Connectors for more information.

Inspiron 530sa/530sc

1

security cable slot

Security cable slot lets you attach a commercially available antitheft device to the computer. For more information, see the instructions included with the device.

2

padlock rings

Padlock rings are for attaching a commercially available theft-deterrent device. The padlock rings allows you to secure the computer cover to the chassis with a padlock to prevent unauthorized access to the inside of the computer. To use the padlock rings, insert a commercially available padlock through the rings, and then lock the padlock.

3

power supply light

Indicates power availability for power supply.

NOTE: May or may not be available on your computer.

4

power connector

Insert the power cable.

5

voltage selector switch

For selecting voltage rating.

6

card slots

Access connectors for any installed PCI and PCI Express cards.

7

back panel connectors

Plug USB, audio, and other devices into the appropriate connector. See Back Panel Connectors for more information.

Inspiron 530sb/530sd

1

security cable slot

Security cable slot lets you attach a commercially available antitheft device to the computer. For more information, see the instructions included with the device.

2

padlock rings

Padlock rings are for attaching a commercially available theft-deterrent device. The padlock rings allows you to secure the computer cover to the chassis with a padlock to prevent unauthorized access to the inside of the computer. To use the padlock rings, insert a commercially available padlock through the rings, and then lock the padlock.

3

power supply light

Indicates power availability for power supply.

NOTE: May or may not be available on your computer.

4

power connector

Insert the power cable.

5

voltage selector switch

For selecting voltage rating.

6

card slots

Access connectors for any installed PCI and PCI Express cards.

7

back panel connectors

Plug USB, audio, and other devices into the appropriate connector. See Inspiron 530sb/530sd for more information.


Back Panel Connectors

Inspiron 530s/530sa/530sc

1

network activity light

Flashes a yellow light when the computer is transmitting or receiving network data. A high volume of network traffic may make this light appear to be in a steady "on" state.

2

network adapter connector

To attach your computer to a network or broadband device, connect one end of a network cable to either a network port or your network or broadband device. Connect the other end of the network cable to the network adapter connector on the back panel of your computer. A click indicates that the network cable has been securely attached.

NOTE: Do not plug a telephone cable into the network connector.

On computers with a network connector card, use the connector on the card.
It is recommended that you use Category 5 wiring and connectors for your network. If you must use Category 3 wiring, force the network speed to 10 Mbps to ensure reliable operation.

3

link integrity light

  • Green — A good connection exists between the 10/100-Mbps network and the computer.
  • Off — The computer is not detecting a physical connection to the network.

4

center/Subwoofer connector

Use the orange connector to attach a speaker to a Low Frequency Effects (LFE) audio channel. LFE audio channel is found in digital surround sound audio schemes that carries only low frequency information of 80 Hz and below. The LFE channel drives a subwoofer to provide extremely low bass extension. Systems not using subwoofers can shunt the LFE information to the main speakers in the surround sound set-up.

5

line-in connector

Use the blue line-in connector to attach a record/playback device such as a cassette player, CD player, or VCR.
On computers with a sound card, use the connector on the card.

6

front L/R line-out connector

Use the green line-out connector (available on computers with integrated sound) to attach headphones and most speakers with integrated amplifiers.
On computers with a sound card, use the connector on the card.

7

microphone connector

Use the pink connector to attach a personal computer microphone for voice or musical input into a sound or telephony program.
On computers with a sound card, the microphone connector is on the card.

8

side L/R surround connector

Use the gray connector to provide enhanced surround audio for computers with 7.1 speakers.
On computers with a sound card, the microphone connector is on the card.

9

rear L/R surround connector

Use the black surround connector to attach multichannel-capable speakers.

10

USB 2.0 connectors (4)

Use the back USB connectors for devices that typically remain connected, such as printers and keyboards.

It is recommended that you use the front USB connectors for devices that you connect occasionally, such as joysticks or cameras.

11

VGA video connector

Connect the monitor's VGA cable to the VGA connector on the computer.

On computers with a video card, use the connector on the card.

Inspiron 530sb/530sd

1

network activity light

Flashes a yellow light when the computer is transmitting or receiving network data. A high volume of network traffic may make this light appear to be in a steady "on" state.

2

network adapter connector

To attach your computer to a network or broadband device, connect one end of a network cable to either a network port or your network or broadband device. Connect the other end of the network cable to the network adapter connector on the back panel of your computer. A click indicates that the network cable has been securely attached.

NOTE: Do not plug a telephone cable into the network connector.

On computers with a network connector card, use the connector on the card.
It is recommended that you use Category 5 wiring and connectors for your network. If you must use Category 3 wiring, force the network speed to 10 Mbps to ensure reliable operation.

3

link integrity light

  • Green — A good connection exists between the 10/100-Mbps network and the computer.
  • Off — The computer is not detecting a physical connection to the network.

4

line-in connector / surround out

Use the blue line-in connector to attach a record/playback device such as a cassette player, CD player, or VCR.
On computers with a sound card, use the connector on the card.

NOTE: To configure this connector to 5.1- Channel, see Configuring the Audio Connectors for 5.1- Channel.

5

front L/R line-out connector

Use the green line-out connector (available on computers with integrated sound) to attach headphones and most speakers with integrated amplifiers.
On computers with a sound card, use the connector on the card.

6

microphone connector/
center/sub woofer speaker out

Use the pink connector to attach a personal computer microphone for voice or musical input into a sound or telephony program.
On computers with a sound card, the microphone connector is on the card.

NOTE: To configure this connector to 5.1- Channel, see Configuring the Audio Connectors for 5.1- Channel.

7

USB 2.0 connectors (4)

Use the back USB connectors for devices that typically remain connected, such as printers and keyboards.

It is recommended that you use the front USB connectors for devices that you connect occasionally, such as joysticks or cameras.

8

VGA video connector

Connect the monitor's VGA cable to the VGA connector on the computer.

On computers with a video card, use the connector on the card.


Installing Your Computer in an Enclosure

Installing your computer in an enclosure can restrict the airflow and impact your computer's performance, possibly causing it to overheat. Follow the guidelines below when installing your computer in an enclosure:

NOTICE: The operating temperature specifications indicated in this Owner's Manual reflects the maximum ambient operating temperature. The room ambient temperature needs to be a consideration when installing your computer in an enclosure. For example, if the ambient room temperature is at 25° C (77° F), depending on your computer's specifications, you only have 5° to 10° C (9° to 18° F) temperature margin before you reach your computer's maximum operating temperature. For details about your computer's specifications, see Specifications.


Setting Up a Printer

NOTICE: Complete the operating system setup before you connect a printer to the computer.

See the documentation that came with the printer for setup information, including how to:

For technical assistance, refer to the printer owner's manual or contact the printer manufacturer.

Printer Cable

Your printer connects to your computer with either a USB cable or a parallel cable. Your printer may not come with a printer cable, so if you purchase a cable separately, ensure that it is compatible with your printer and computer. If you purchased a printer cable at the same time you purchased your computer, the cable may arrive in the computer's shipping box.

Connecting a USB Printer

NOTE: You can connect USB devices while the computer is turned on.
  1. Complete the operating system setup if you have not already done so.

  2. Attach the USB printer cable to the USB connectors on the computer and the printer. The USB connectors fit only one way.

1

USB connector on computer

2

USB connector on printer

3

USB printer cable

  1. Turn on the printer and then turn on the computer.

  2. Depending on your computer's operating system, a printer wizard may be available to help you install the printer driver:

If your computer is running the Microsoft® Windows® XP operating system and the Add New Hardware Wizard window appears, click Cancel.

If your computer is running the Windows Vista® operating system, click the Windows Vista Start button, , and click Network® Add a printer to start the Add Printer Wizard.

  1. Install the printer driver if necessary. See Reinstalling Drivers and Utilities and the documentation that came with your printer.


Playing CDs and DVDs

NOTICE: Do not press down on the CD or DVD tray when you open or close it. Keep the tray closed when you are not using the drive.
NOTICE: Do not move the computer when you are playing CDs or DVDs.
  1. Press the eject button on the front of the drive.

  2. Place the disc, label side out, in the tray.

  1. Ensure that the lower edge of the CD or DVD is seated inside the lower lip of the tray.

  2. Gently push in the tray.

To format CDs for storing data, to create music CDs, or to copy CDs, see the CD software that came with your computer.

NOTE: Ensure that you follow all copyright laws when you create CDs.

A CD player includes the following basic buttons:

Play

Move backward within the current track

Pause

Move forward within the current track

Stop

Go to the previous track

Eject

Go to the next track

A DVD player includes the following basic buttons:

Stop

Restart the current chapter

Play

Fast forward

Pause

Fast reverse

Advance a single frame while in pause mode

Go to the next title or chapter

Continuously play the current title or chapter

Go to the previous title or chapter

Eject

For more information on playing CDs or DVDs, click Help on the CD or DVD player (if available).

Adjusting the Volume

NOTE: When the speakers are muted, you do not hear the CD or DVD playing.

Microsoft® Windows® XP

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel® Sounds, and then click Audio Devices.

  2. Under the Volume tab, click and drag the device volume slider to adjust the sound volume.

Windows Vista®

  1. Click the Windows Vista Start button , point to Control Panel® Hardware and Sound® Sound, and then click Adjust System Volume.

  2. In the Volume Mixer window, click and drag the bar in the Speakers column and slide it up or down to increase or decrease the volume.

Configuring the Audio Connectors for 5.1- Channel

NOTE: The following is applicable only for Inspiron 530sb/530sd.

Windows XP

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel® Sounds® Audio devices® Volume.

  2. Under Speaker settings click Advanced.

  3. Under Speaker Setup choose Surround sound 5.1 setup.

Windows Vista

  1. Click Start , point to Control Panel® Hardware and Sound® Sound.

  2. Under the Playback tab select Speakers/Headphones. Click on Configure and select 5.1 Surround. Click Next.

  3. Under Speaker Setup, customize your configuration by selecting the check boxes for Optional speakers. Click Next.

  4. Select the check boxes for Full-range speakers. Click Next® Finish.

Adjusting the Picture

If an error message notifies you that the current resolution and color depth are using too much memory and preventing DVD playback, adjust the display properties:

Windows XP

  1. Click Start® Control Panel® Appearance and Themes.

  2. Under Pick a task..., click Change the screen resolution.

  3. Under Screen resolution, click and drag the bar to reduce the resolution setting.

  4. In the drop-down menu under Color quality, click Medium (16 bit) and click OK.

Windows Vista

  1. Click Start , click Control Panel, and then click Appearance and Personalization.

  2. Under Personalization, click Adjust Screen Resolution.

The Display Properties window appears.

  1. Under Resolution: click and drag the bar reduce the resolution setting.

  2. In the drop-down menu under Colors:, click Medium (16 bit).

  3. Click OK.


Copying CDs and DVDs

NOTE: Ensure that you observe all copyright laws when creating CDs or DVDs.

This section applies only to computers that have a CD-RW, DVD+/-RW, or CD-RW/DVD (combo) drive.

NOTE: The types of CD or DVD drives offered by Dell may vary by country.

The following instructions explain how to make an exact copy of a CD or DVD. You can also use Sonic Digital Media for other purposes, such as creating music CDs from audio files stored on your computer or backing up important data. For help, open Sonic Digital Media and then click the question mark icon in the upper-right corner of the window.

How to Copy a CD or DVD

NOTE: CD-RW/DVD combo drives cannot write to DVD media. If you have a CD-RW/DVD combo drive and you experience recording problems, check for available software patches on the Sonic support website at www.sonic.com.

The DVD-writable drives installed in Dell™ computers can write to and read DVD+/-R, DVD+/-RW, and DVD+R DL (dual layer) media, but cannot write to and may not read DVD-RAM or DVD-R DL media.

NOTE: Most commercial DVDs have copyright protection and cannot be copied using Sonic DigitalMedia.
  1. Click Start ® All Programs® Sonic® DigitalMedia Projects® Copy® Disc Copy.

  2. To copy the CD or DVD:

When prompted, insert a blank CD or DVD into the drive and click OK.

Once you have finished copying the source CD or DVD, the CD or DVD that you have created automatically ejects.

Using Blank CDs and DVDs

CD-RW drives can write to CD recording media only (including high-speed CD-RW) while DVD-writable drives can write to both CD and DVD recording media.

Use blank CD-Rs to record music or permanently store data files. After creating a CD-R, you cannot write to that CD-R again (see the Sonic documentation for more information). Use blank CD-RWs to write to CDs or to erase, rewrite, or update data on CDs.

Blank DVD+/-Rs can be used to permanently store large amounts of information. After you create a DVD+/-R disc, you may not be able to write to that disc again if the disc is "finalized" or "closed" during the final stage of the disc creation process. Use blank DVD+/-RWs if you plan to erase, rewrite, or update information on that disc later.

CD-Writable Drives

Media Type

Read

Write

Rewritable

CD-R

Yes

Yes

No

CD-RW

Yes

Yes

Yes

DVD-Writable Drives

Media Type

Read

Write

Rewritable

CD-R

Yes

Yes

No

CD-RW

Yes

Yes

Yes

DVD+R

Yes

Yes

No

DVD-R

Yes

Yes

No

DVD+RW

Yes

Yes

Yes

DVD-RW

Yes

Yes

Yes

DVD+R DL

Yes

Yes

No

Helpful Tips


Using a Media Card Reader (Optional)

Use the Media Card Reader to transfer data directly to your computer.

The Media Card Reader supports the following memory types:

For information on installing a Media Card Reader, see Installing a Media Card Reader.

1

Memory Stick (MS/MS Pro)

2

SecureDigital Card (SD)/ MultiMediaCard (MMC)

3

CompactFlash Type I and II (CF I/II) and MicroDrive Card

4

xD-Picture Card and SmartMedia (SMC)

To use the Media Card Reader:

  1. Check the media or card to determine the proper orientation for insertion.

  2. Slide the media or card into the appropriate slot until it is completely seated in the connector.

If you encounter resistance, do not force the media or card. Check the card orientation and try again.


Connecting Two Monitors

CAUTION: Before you begin any of the procedures in this section, follow the safety instructions in the Product Information Guide.

If you purchased a graphics card that supports dual monitors, follow these instructions to connect and enable your monitors. The instructions tell you how to connect either two monitors (each with a VGA connector), one monitor with a VGA connector and one monitor with a DVI connector, or a TV.

NOTICE: If you are connecting two monitors that have VGA connectors, you must have the optional DVI adapter to connect the cable. If you are connecting two flat-panel monitors, at least one of them must have a VGA connector. If you are connecting a TV, you may connect only one monitor (VGA or DVI) in addition to the TV.

Connecting Two Monitors With VGA Connectors

  1. Follow the procedures in Before You Begin.

NOTE: The integrated video card is disabled when an add-on graphics card is installed. The integrated video card port is capped when the port is disabled. Do not remove the cap to connect a monitor. The monitor will not function.
  1. Connect one of the monitors to the VGA (blue) connector on the back of the computer.

  2. Connect the other monitor to the optional DVI adapter and connect the DVI adapter to the DVI (white) connector on the back of the computer.

1

optional DVI adapter

2

DVI (white) connector

3

TV-OUT connector

4

VGA (blue) connector

Connecting One Monitor With a VGA Connector and One Monitor With a DVI Connector

  1. Follow the procedures in Before You Begin.

  2. Connect the VGA connector on the monitor to the VGA (blue) connector on the back of the computer.

  3. Connect the DVI connector on the other monitor to the DVI (white) connector on the back of the computer.

Connecting a TV

NOTE: You must purchase an S-video cable, available at most consumer electronics stores, to connect a TV to your computer. It is not included with your computer.
  1. Follow the procedures in Before You Begin.

  2. Connect one end of the S-video cable to the optional TV-OUT connector on the back of the computer.

  3. Connect the other end of the S-video cable to the S-video input connector on your TV.

  4. Connect the VGA or DVI monitor.

Changing the Display Settings

  1. After you connect the monitor(s) or TV, turn on the computer.

The Microsoft® Windows® desktop displays on the primary monitor.

  1. Enable clone mode or extended desktop mode in the display settings.

For information on changing the display settings for your graphics card, see the user's guide in the Help and Support Center (click Start , click Help and Support, click User and system guides, click Device guides, and then click the guide for your graphics card).


Power Management

Power Management Options in Microsoft® Windows® XP

The Microsoft® Windows® XP power management features can reduce the amount of electricity your computer uses when it is on and you are not using it. You can reduce power to just the monitor or the hard drive, or you can use standby mode or hibernate mode to reduce power to the entire computer. When the computer exits from a power conservation mode, it returns to the operating state it was in prior to entering the mode.

NOTE: Windows XP Professional includes security and networking features not available in Windows XP Home Edition. When a Windows XP Professional computer is connected to a network, different options related to security and networking appear in certain windows.
NOTE: The procedures to activate the standby and hibernate modes may vary according to your operating system.

Standby Mode

Standby mode conserves power by turning off the display and the hard drive after a designated period of time, known as a time-out. When the computer exits from standby mode, it returns to the operating state it was in prior to entering standby mode.

NOTICE: If your computer loses power while in standby mode, it may lose data.
NOTICE: The graphics card in your computer is installed in the PCI Express x16 slot. When there is a card in this slot and you add a peripheral that does not support s3 suspend, your computer will not enter standby mode.

To set standby mode to automatically activate after a defined period of inactivity:

  1. Click the Start button, then click Control Panel.

  2. Define your standby settings on the Power Schemes tab and Advanced tab.

To immediately activate standby mode without a period of inactivity, click the Start button, click Turn Off Computer, and then click Stand by.

To exit from standby mode, press a key on the keyboard or move the mouse.

Hibernate Mode

Hibernate mode conserves power by copying system data to a reserved area on the hard drive, and then completely turning off the computer. When the computer exits from hibernate mode, the desktop is restored to the state it was in prior to entering hibernate mode.

To activate hibernate mode:

  1. Click the Start button, then click Control Panel.

  2. Define your hibernate settings on the Power Schemes tab, Advanced tab, and Hibernate tab.

To exit from hibernate mode, press the power button. The computer may take a short time to exit from hibernate mode. Because the keyboard and the mouse do not function when the computer is in hibernate mode, pressing a key on the keyboard or moving the mouse does not bring the computer out of hibernation.

Because hibernate mode requires a special file on your hard drive with enough disk space to store the contents of the computer memory, Dell creates an appropriately sized hibernate mode file before shipping the computer to you. If the computer's hard drive becomes corrupted, Windows XP recreates the hibernate file automatically.

Power Options Properties

Define your standby mode settings, hibernate mode settings, and other power settings in the Power Options Properties window. To access the Power Options Properties window:

  1. Click the Start button, then click Control Panel.

  2. Define your power settings on the Power Schemes tab, Advanced tab, and Hibernate tab.

Power Schemes Tab

Each standard power setting is called a scheme. If you want to select one of the standard Windows schemes installed on your computer, choose a scheme from the Power schemes drop-down menu. The settings for each scheme appear in the fields below the scheme name. Each scheme has different settings for starting standby mode, hibernate mode, turning off the monitor, and turning off the hard drive.

NOTICE: If you set the hard drive to time-out before the monitor does, your computer may appear to be locked up. To recover, press any key on the keyboard or click the mouse. To avoid this problem, always set the monitor to time-out before the hard drive.

The Power schemes drop-down menu displays the following schemes:

If you want to change the default settings for a scheme, click the drop-down menu in the Turn off monitor, Turn off hard disks, System stand by, or System hibernates field, and then select a time-out from the displayed list. Changing the time-out for a scheme field permanently changes the default settings for that scheme, unless you click Save As and enter a new name for the changed scheme.

Advanced Tab

The Advanced tab allows you to:

To program these functions, click an option from the corresponding drop-down menu and click OK.

Hibernate Tab

The Hibernate tab allows you to enable hibernate mode. If you want to use the hibernate settings as defined on the Power Schemes tab, click the Enable hibernate support check box on the Hibernate tab.

For more information on power management options:

  1. Click the Start button, then click Help and Support.

  2. In the Help and Support window, click Performance and maintenance.

  3. In the Performance and maintenance window, click Conserving power on your computer.

Power Management Options in Windows Vista®

The Windows Vista® power management features are designed to reduce the amount of electricity your computer uses when it is on and you are not using it. You can reduce power to just the monitor or the hard drive, and Windows Vista sets the default "off" state to standby mode or you can set hibernate mode to reduce power even further.

When the computer exits from a power conservation mode (Standby or Hibernate), the Windows desktop is restored to the state it was in before it entered the mode.

Windows Vista has three main default power management modes:

Dell has added a fourth, Dell-Recommended mode that sets power management to the most typical settings for the majority of our customers. This is the active Power Plan.

Standby Mode

Standby mode is the default "off" state for Windows Vista. Standby mode conserves power by turning off the display and the hard drive after a time-out. When the computer exits from standby mode, it returns to the operating state it was in before it entered standby mode.

To set standby mode to automatically activate after a defined period of inactivity:

  1. Click Start and click Control Panel.

  2. Under Pick a category, click System and Maintenance.

  3. Under System and Maintenance, click Power Options.

The next dialog box shows three power plans — the top option is Dell Recommended — this is the currently active plan.

There is also a show additional plans arrow underneath the three power plans. You can have many power plans, but only three are displayed and the top one is the active plan.

To immediately activate standby mode without a period of inactivity, click Start , then click the off button icon. Windows Vista sets Standby as the default off state.

To exit from standby mode, press a key on the keyboard or move the mouse.

NOTICE: If your computer loses power while in standby mode, it may lose data. Windows Vista has a new feature called Hybrid Sleep mode - this saves the data into a file and also puts the system into standby. If you lose power, the system retains your data on the hard drive and resumes to the same state you left it. Go to Help and Support and search for Hybrid Sleep for further information. Hybrid Sleep provides fast wake if the system is in standby, but also keeps your data safe by storing it to the hard drive.

Hibernate Mode

Hibernate mode conserves power by copying system data to a reserved area on the hard drive and then completely turning off the computer. When the computer exits from hibernate mode, the desktop is restored to the state it was in before it entered hibernate mode. Windows Vista may mask Hibernate from the user if Hybrid Sleep is enabled. See Help and Support for further information - search for Hibernate.

To activate hibernate mode immediately (if available):

  1. Click Start and click the arrow .

  2. Select Hibernate from the list.

To exit from hibernate mode, press the power button. The computer may take a short time to exit from hibernate mode. Pressing a key on the keyboard or moving the mouse does not bring the computer out of hibernation, because the keyboard and the mouse do not function when the computer is in hibernate mode.

Because hibernate mode requires a special file on your hard drive with enough disk space to store the contents of the computer memory, Dell creates an appropriately sized hibernate mode file before shipping the computer to you. If the computer's hard drive becomes corrupted, Windows Vista recreates the hibernate file automatically.

Power Plan Properties

Define your standby mode settings, display mode settings, hibernate mode settings (if available), and other power settings in the Power Plan Properties window. To access the Power Plan Properties window:

  1. Click Start and click Control Panel.

  2. Under Pick a category, click System and Maintenance.

  3. Under System and Maintenance, click Power Options.

  4. This takes you to the main Select a Power Plan window.

  5. In the Select A Power Plan window, you can change or modify power settings.

To change the default settings for a plan:

  1. Click Start and click Control Panel.

  2. Under Pick a category, click System and Maintenance.

  3. Under System and Maintenance, click Power Options.

A number of options are available on the left-hand side of the Power Options dialog box.

Click Change Plan Settings just below any of the power plans to change settings such as:

Advanced Tab

The Advanced tab allows you to set many different settings beyond the basic ones above. If you do not know or are not sure what to set, then leave settings at the default. To access the advanced settings:

  1. Choose the Power Plan you want to change.

  2. Click Change Plan Settings from just below the plan name.

  3. Click Change Advanced Power Settings.

CAUTION: There are many different settings in the Power Options, Advanced Settings dialog box. Use care when making setting changes.

Click Start and then click Help and Support to explore the capabilities of the advanced settings.


Enabling SpeedStep™ Technology

SpeedStep technology controls your computer's processor performance automatically, dynamically adjusting the operating frequency and voltage, according to the task at hand. When an application does not require full performance, significant amounts of power can be saved. Performance is designed to still be responsive, with maximum processor performance being delivered when required, and automatic power savings when possible.

Windows Vista automatically sets Intel Speedstep technologies in the Dell Recommended, Balanced, and Power Saver power plans. It is disabled in the High Performance power plan.


About RAID Configurations

NOTE: RAID is not supported on Inspiron 530sb/530sd.

This section provides an overview of the RAID configuration that you may have selected when you purchased your computer. Your computer supports RAID level 1. RAID level 1 configuration is recommended for the data integrity requirements of digital photography and audio.

The Intel RAID controller on your computer can only create a RAID volume using two physical drives. If a third drive is present, then that drive cannot be made part of a RAID volume using the Intel RAID configuration program, although it can be used as a spare drive in a RAID 1 configuration (see Creating a Spare Hard Drive). However, if four drives are present in your computer, then each pair of drives can be set as a RAID level 1 volume. The drives should be the same size in order to ensure that the larger drive does not contain unallocated (and therefore unusable) space.

RAID Level 1 Configuration

RAID level 1 uses a data-redundancy storage technique known as "mirroring." When data is written to the primary drive, it is also duplicated, or mirrored, on the other drive. A RAID level 1 configuration sacrifices high data access rates for its data redundancy advantages.

If a drive failure occurs, subsequent read and write operations are directed to the surviving drive. A replacement drive can then be rebuilt using the data from the surviving drive. Also, because data is duplicated on both drives, two 120-GB RAID level 1 drives collectively have a maximum of 120-GB on which to store data.

NOTE: In a RAID level 1 configuration, the size of the configuration is equal to the size of the smallest drive in the configuration.

Configuring Your Hard Drives for RAID

At some point you may want to configure your computer for RAID if you did not select a RAID configuration when you purchased your computer. You must have at least two hard drives installed in your computer to set up a RAID configuration. For information on how to install a hard drive, see Hard Drives.

You can use one of two methods to configure RAID hard drive volumes. One method uses the Intel® Option ROM utility, and is performed before you install the operating system onto the hard drive. The second method uses the Intel Matrix Storage Manager or Intel Storage Utility, and this method is performed after you have installed the operating system and the Intel Storage Utility. Both methods require that you set your computer to RAID-enabled mode before starting any of the RAID configuration procedures in this document.

Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode

  1. Enter the system setup (see System Setup).

  2. Press the left- and right- arrow keys to highlight Integrated Peripherals and press <Enter>.

  3. Press the up- and down- arrow keys to highlight Drive Controller, and then press <Enter>.

  4. Press the up- and down- arrow keys to highlight SATA Mode, and then press <Enter> to access the options.

  5. Press the up- and down- arrow keys to highlight RAID, and then press <Enter> to enable RAID.

  6. Press <F10> to save and exit System Setup.

Configuring for RAID Using the Intel® Option ROM Utility

NOTE: Although any size drives may be used to create a RAID configuration using the Intel Option ROM utility, ideally the drives should be of equal size. In a RAID level 1 configuration, the size of the array will be the smaller of the two disks used.

Creating a RAID Level 1 Configuration

  1. Set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode).

  2. Press <Ctrl><i> when you are prompted to enter Intel RAID Option ROM.

  3. Use the up- and down-arrow keys to highlight Create RAID Volume, and press <Enter>.

  4. Enter a RAID volume name or accept the default, and press <Enter>.

  5. Use the up- and down-arrow keys to select RAID1(Mirror), and press <Enter>.

  6. If there are more than two hard disks available, use the up- and down- arrow keys and space bar to select the two disks you want to use to make up your array, and then press <Enter>.

  7. Select the desired capacity for the volume, and press <Enter>. The default value is the maximum available size.

  8. Press <Enter> to create the volume.

  9. Press <y> to confirm that you want to create the RAID volume.

  10. Confirm that the correct volume configuration is displayed on the main Intel Option ROM screen.

  11. Use the up- and down-arrow keys to select Exit, and press <Enter>.

  12. Install the operating system.

Deleting a RAID Volume

NOTE: When you perform this operation, all data on the RAID drives will be lost.
NOTE: If your computer currently boots to RAID and you delete the RAID volume in the Intel RAID Option ROM, your computer will become unbootable.
  1. Press <Ctrl><i> when you are prompted to enter the Intel RAID Option ROM utility.

  2. Use the up- and down-arrow keys to highlight Delete RAID Volume, and press <Enter>.

  3. Use the up- and down-arrow keys to highlight the RAID volume you want to delete, and press <Delete>.

  4. Press <y> to confirm the deletion of the RAID volume.

  5. Press <Esc> to exit the Intel Option ROM utility.

Configuring for RAID Using the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager

If you already have one hard drive with the operating system installed on it, and you want to add a second hard drive and reconfigure both drives into a RAID volume without losing the existing operating system and any data, you need to use the migrating option (see Migrating to a RAID 1 Volume or Migrating to a RAID 1 Volume). Create a RAID 1 Volume only when:

Creating a RAID 1 Volume

NOTE: When you perform this operation, all data on the RAID drives will be lost.
  1. Set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode).

  2. Click Start and point to All Programs® Intel® Matrix Storage Manager® Intel Matrix Storage Console to launch the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager.

NOTE: If you do not see an Actions menu option, you have not yet set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode).
  1. On the Actions menu, select Create RAID Volume to launch the Create RAID Volume Wizard.

  2. Click Next at the first screen.

  3. Confirm the volume name, select RAID 1 as the RAID level, and then click Next to continue.

  4. On the Select Volume Location screen, click the first hard drive you want to use to create your RAID 1 volume, and then click the right arrow. Click a second hard drive until two drives appear in the Selected window, and then click Next.

  5. In the Specify Volume Size window, select the Volume Size desired and click Next.

  6. Click Finish to create the volume, or click Back to make changes.

  7. Follow Microsoft Windows procedures for creating a partition on the new RAID volume.

Deleting a RAID Volume

NOTE: While this procedure deletes the RAID 1 volume, it also splits the RAID 1 volume into two non-RAID hard drives with a partition, and leaves any existing data files intact. Deleting a RAID 1 volume, however, destroys all data on the volume.
  1. Click Start and point to All Programs® Intel® Matrix Storage Manager® Intel Matrix Storage Console to launch the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager.

  2. Right-click the Volume icon of the RAID volume you want to delete, and select Delete Volume.

  3. On the Delete RAID Volume Wizard screen, click Next.

  4. Highlight the RAID volume you want to delete in the Available box, click the right-arrow button to move the highlighted RAID volume into the Selected box, and then click Next.

  5. Click Finish to delete the volume.

Migrating to a RAID 1 Volume

  1. Set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode).

  2. Click Start and point to All Programs® Intel® Matrix Storage Manager® Intel Matrix Storage Console to launch the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager.

NOTE: If you do not see an Actions menu option, you have not yet set your computer to RAID-enabled mode (see Setting Your Computer to RAID-Enabled Mode).
  1. On the Actions menu, click Create RAID Volume From Existing Hard Drive to launch the Migration Wizard.

  2. Click Next on the first Migration Wizard screen.

  3. Enter a RAID volume name or accept the default.

  4. From the drop-down box, select RAID 1 as the RAID level.

NOTE: Select the hard drive that already has the data or operating system files that you want to maintain on the RAID volume as your source hard drive.
  1. On the Select Source Hard Drive screen, double-click the hard drive from which you want to migrate, and click Next.

  2. On the Select Member Hard Drive screen, double-click the hard drive to select the member drive that you want to act as the mirror in the array, and click Next.

  3. On the Specify Volume Size screen, select the volume size you want, and click Next.

NOTE: In the following step, you will lose all data contained on the member drive.
  1. Click Finish to start migrating, or click Back to make changes. You can use your computer normally during migration process.

Creating a Spare Hard Drive

A spare hard drive may be created with a RAID 1 array. The spare hard drive is not recognized by the operating system, but you can see the spare drive from within Disk Manager or the Intel Option ROM Utility. When a member of the RAID 1 array is broken, the computer automatically rebuilds the mirror array using the spare hard drive as the broken member's replacement.

To Mark a Drive as a Spare Hard Drive:

  1. Click Start and point to All Programs® Intel® Matrix Storage Manager® Intel Matrix Storage Console to launch the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager.

  2. Right-click the hard drive you want to mark as a spare hard drive.

  3. Click Mark as Spare.

To Remove Spare Marking From a Spare Hard Drive:

  1. Right-click the spare hard drive icon.

  2. Click Reset Hard Drive to Non-RAID

Rebuilding a Degraded RAID 1 Volume

If your computer does not have a spare hard drive, and the computer has reported a degraded RAID 1 volume, you can manually rebuild the computer's redundancy mirror to a new hard drive by performing the following steps:

  1. Click Start and point to All Programs® Intel® Matrix Storage Manager® Intel Matrix Storage Console to launch the Intel® Matrix Storage Manager.

  2. Right-click the available hard drive to which you want to rebuild the RAID 1 volume, and click Rebuild to this Disk.

  3. You can use your computer while the computer is rebuilding the RAID 1 volume.


Transferring Information to a New Computer

You can use your operating system "wizards" to help you transfer files and other data from one computer to another—for example, from an old computer to a new computer. For instructions, see the following section that corresponds to the operating system your computer is running.

Microsoft® Windows® XP

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system provides the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard to move data from a source computer to a new computer. You can transfer data, such as:

You can transfer the data to the new computer over a network or serial connection, or you can store it on removable media, such as a writable CD, for transfer to the new computer.

NOTE: You can transfer information from an old computer to a new computer by directly connecting a serial cable to the input/output (I/O) ports of the two computers. To transfer data over a serial connection, you must access the Network Connections utility from the Control Panel and perform additional configuration steps, such as setting up an advanced connection and designating the host computer and the guest computer.

For instructions on setting up a direct cable connection between two computers, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article #305621, titled How to Set Up a Direct Cable Connection Between Two Computers in Windows XP. This information may not be available in certain countries.

For transferring information to a new computer, you must run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. You can use the optional Operating System media for this process or you can create a wizard disk with the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.

Running the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard With the Operating System Media

NOTE: This procedure requires the Operating System media. This media is optional and may not be included with certain computers.

To prepare a new computer for the file transfer:

  1. Open the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard: click Start® All Programs® Accessories® System Tools® Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.

  2. When the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard welcome screen appears, click Next.

  3. On the Which computer is this? screen, click New Computer® Next.

  4. On the Do you have a Windows XP CD? screen, click I will use the wizard from the Windows XP CD® Next.

  5. When the Now go to your old computer screen appears, go to your old or source computer. Do not click Next at this time.

To copy data from the old computer:

  1. On the old computer, insert the Windows XP Operating System media.

  2. On the Welcome to Microsoft Windows XP screen, click Perform additional tasks.

  3. Under What do you want to do?, click Transfer files and settings®Next.

  4. On the Which computer is this? screen, click Old Computer®Next.

  5. On the Select a transfer method screen, click the transfer method you prefer.

  6. On the What do you want to transfer? screen, select the items you want to transfer and click Next.

After the information has been copied, the Completing the Collection Phase screen appears.

  1. Click Finish.

To transfer data to the new computer:

  1. On the Now go to your old computer screen on the new computer, click Next.

  2. On the Where are the files and settings? screen, select the method you chose for transferring your settings and files and click Next.

The wizard reads the collected files and settings and applies them to your new computer.

When all of the settings and files have been applied, the Finished screen appears.

  1. Click Finished and restart the new computer.

Running the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard Without the Operating System Media

To run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard without the Operating System media, you must create a wizard disk that will allow you to create a backup image file to removable media.

To create a wizard disk, use your new computer with Windows XP and perform the following steps:

  1. Open the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard: click Start® All Programs® Accessories® System Tools® Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.

  2. When the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard welcome screen appears, click Next.

  3. On the Which computer is this? screen, click New Computer® Next.

  4. On the Do you have a Windows XP CD? screen, click I want to create a Wizard Disk in the following drive® Next.

  5. Insert the removable media, such as a writable CD, and click OK.

  6. When the disk creation completes and the Now go to your old computer message appears, do not click Next.

  7. Go to the old computer.

To copy data from the old computer:

  1. On the old computer, insert the wizard disk.

  2. Click Start® Run.

  3. In the Open field on the Run window, browse to the path for fastwiz (on the appropriate removable media) and click OK.

  4. On the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard welcome screen, click Next.

  5. On the Which computer is this? screen, click Old Computer® Next.

  6. On the Select a transfer method screen, click the transfer method you prefer.

  7. On the What do you want to transfer? screen, select the items you want to transfer and click Next.

After the information has been copied, the Completing the Collection Phase screen appears.

  1. Click Finish.

To transfer data to the new computer:

  1. On the Now go to your old computer screen on the new computer, click Next.

  2. On the Where are the files and settings? screen, select the method you chose for transferring your settings and files and click Next. Follow the instructions on the screen.

The wizard reads the collected files and settings and applies them to your new computer.

When all of the settings and files have been applied, the Finished screen appears.

  1. Click Finished and restart the new computer.

NOTE: For more information about this procedure, search support.dell.com for document #154781 (What Are The Different Methods To Transfer Files From My Old Computer To My New Dell™ Computer Using the Microsoft® Windows® XP Operating System?).
NOTE: Access to the Dell™ Knowledge Base document may not be available in certain countries.

Windows Vista®

Windows Vista® operating system provides the Windows Easy Transfer wizard to move data from a source computer to a new computer. You can transfer data, such as:

You can transfer the data to the new computer over a network or serial connection, or you can store it on removable media, such as a writable CD, for transfer to the new computer.

There are two ways to access the Easy Transfer wizard:

  1. When Vista setup is completed, you will see the Vista Welcome Center. One icon in the Welcome Center is Transfer Files and Settings. Click this icon to start Windows Easy Transfer.

  2. If the Welcome Center dialog box has been closed, you can access Windows Easy Transfer by clicking Start ® All Programs ® Accessories® System Tools® Easy Transfer.

  3. Double-click the Easy Transfer icon to begin the process.


Setting Up a Home and Office Network

Connecting to a Network Adapter

NOTICE: Plug the network cable into the network adapter connector on the computer. Do not plug the network cable into the modem connector on the computer. Do not plug a network cable into a telephone wall jack.
  1. Connect the network cable to the network adapter connector on the back of your computer.

Insert the cable until it clicks into place, and then gently pull it to ensure that it is secure.

  1. Connect the other end of the network cable to a network device.

1

network adapter connector

2

network device

3

network adapter connector on computer

4

network cable

Setting Up a Network in the Microsoft® Windows® XP Operating System

  1. Click Start® All Programs® Accessories® Communications® Network Setup Wizard® Next® Checklist for creating a network.

NOTE: Selecting the connection method labeled This computer connects directly to the Internet enables the integrated firewall provided with Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2).
  1. Complete the checklist.

  2. Return to the Network Setup Wizard and follow the instructions in the wizard.

Setting Up a Network in the Windows Vista® Operating System

  1. Click Start , and then click Connect To® Set up a connection or network.

  2. Select an option under Choose a connection option.

  3. Click Next, and then follow the instructions in the wizard.


Connecting to the Internet

NOTE: ISPs and ISP offerings vary by country.

To connect to the Internet, you need a modem or network connection and an Internet service provider (ISP). Your ISP will offer one or more of the following Internet connection options:

If you are using a dial-up connection, connect a telephone line to the modem connector on your computer and to the telephone wall jack before you set up your Internet connection. If you are using a DSL or cable/satellite modem connection, contact your ISP or cellular telephone service for setup instructions.

Setting Up Your Internet Connection

To set up an Internet connection with a provided ISP desktop shortcut:

  1. Save and close any open files, and exit any open programs.

  2. Double-click the ISP icon on the Microsoft® Windows® desktop.

  3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the setup.

If you do not have an ISP icon on your desktop or if you want to set up an Internet connection with a different ISP, perform the steps in the following section that corresponds to the operating system your computer is using.

NOTE: If you are having problems connecting to the Internet, see E-Mail, Modem, and Internet Problems. If you cannot connect to the Internet but have successfully connected in the past, the ISP might have a service outage. Contact your ISP to check the service status, or try connecting again later.

Windows XP

  1. Save and close any open files, and exit any open programs.

  2. Click Start® Internet Explorer.

The New Connection Wizard appears.

  1. Click Connect to the Internet.

  2. In the next window, click the appropriate option:

  3. Click Next.

If you selected Set up my connection manually, continue to step 6. Otherwise, follow the instructions on the screen to complete the setup.

NOTE: If you do not know which type of connection to select, contact your ISP.
  1. Click the appropriate option under How do you want to connect to the Internet?, and then click Next.

  2. Use the setup information provided by your ISP to complete the setup.

Windows Vista®

NOTE: Have your ISP information ready. If you do not have an ISP, the Connect to the Internet wizard can help you get one.
  1. Save and close any open files, and exit any open programs.

  2. Click Start , and click Control Panel

  3. Under Network and Internet, click Connect to the Internet.

The Connect to the Internet window appears.

  1. Click either Broadband (PPPoE) or Dial-up, depending on how you want to connect:

NOTE: If you do not know which type of connection to select, click Help me choose or contact your ISP.
  1. Follow the instructions on the screen and use the setup information provided by your ISP to complete the setup.


Back to Contents Page